IPPF

Toward Safe Accessibility of Opioid Pain Medicines in Vietnam and Other Developing Countries: A Balanced Policy Method

Citation:

Eric L. Krakauer, Nguyen Thi Phuong Cham, Syeda Asra Husain, Nguyen Thi Hai Yen, David E. Joranson, Luong Ngoc Khue, Martha A. Maurer. Toward Safe Accessibility of Opioid Pain Medicines in Vietnam and Other Developing Countries: A Balanced Policy Method, Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 49(5):916-922.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2014.10.012

Moderate or severe pain is common among people with advanced cancer and other life-threatening illnesses. Yet despite agreement that pain relief is a human right, the poorest 80% of the world's population rarely have access to strong opioid analgesics. Excessively restrictive opioid policies, especially in developing countries, both stem from and propagate misguided fears about opioids, so-called opiophobia.

Opioid Availability and Palliative Care in Nepal: Influence of an International Pain Policy Fellowship

Citation:

Bishnu Dutta Paudel, Karen M. Ryan, Mary Skemp Brown, Eric L. Krakauer, M.R. Rajagopal, Martha A. Maurer, James F. Cleary, Opioid Availability and Palliative Care in Nepal: Influence of an International Pain Policy Fellowship, Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Volume 49, Issue 1, January 2015, Pages 110-116, ISSN 0885-3924, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2014.02.011.
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0885392414002176)

Globally, cancer incidence and mortality are increasing, and most of the burden is shifting to low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where patients often present with late-stage disease and severe pain. Unfortunately, LMICs also face a disproportionate lack of access to pain-relieving medicines such as morphine, despite the medical and scientific literature that shows morphine to be effective to treat moderate and severe cancer pain.

Integrating palliative care in public health: The Colombian experience following an International Pain Policy Fellowship

Citation:

Leon MX, Florez S, De Lima L, Ryan K. Integrating palliative care in public health:  The Colombian experience following an International Pain Policy Fellowship. Palliat Med 2011; published on-line 12 January 2011.

Country

Access to palliative care is insufficient in many countries around the world. In an effort to improve access to palliative care services and treatments, a public health approach as suggested by the World Health Organization was implemented in Colombia to improve opioid availability, increase awareness and competences about palliative care for healthcare workers, and to include palliative care as a component of care in legislation.

Improving Availability of and Access to Opioids in Colombia: Description and Preliminary Results of an Action Plan for the Country

Citation:

Leon MX, De Lima L, Florez S et al. Improving availability of and access to opioids in Colombia: description and preliminary results of an action plan for the country. J Pain Symptom Manage 2009;38:758-766. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2009.03.007

Country

Latin America consumes less than 2.7% of the morphine in the world, as reported by the governments to the International Narcotics Control Board. Methods to improve access to opioids for the treatment of pain have been developed by the Pain & Policy Studies Group (PPSG), a World Health Organization Collaborating Center at the University of Wisconsin. This article describes the preparation and implementation of an action plan in Colombia as a part of an international fellowship program on opioid policy developed by the PPSG and funded by the Open Society Institute.

5 selected for African Pain Policy Fellowship

Submitted by jpmoen on Wed, 2014-05-07 10:28

The Pain & Policy Studies Group (PPSG) / World Health Organization Collaborating Center on Pain Policy in Palliative Care is excited to announce its collaboration on a pilot program with the African Palliative Care Association (APCA) to train in-country champions to improve patient access to pain medicines. To build on its well-established International Pain Policy Fellowship (IPPF) program, funding has been received from the National Cancer Institute (National Institutes of Health) to develop an African Pain Policy Fellowship (APPF).

Ten Fellows selected for 2012 International Pain Policy Fellowship

Submitted by jpmoen on Thu, 2012-07-05 12:06

The Pain & Policy Studies Group (PPSG) / World Health Organization Collaborating Center is very pleased to announce the selection of ten Fellows for its Cohort III International Pain Policy Fellowship (IPPF) program. Built on the success of the previous two cohorts of this program in 2006 and 2008, LIVESTRONG (Lance Armstrong Foundation) and the Open Society Foundations (OSF) International Palliative Care Initiative are providing major funding to support these Fellows for a two-year project.