Policy

Opioid Availability and Palliative Care in Nepal: Influence of an International Pain Policy Fellowship

Citation:
Bishnu Dutta Paudel, Karen M. Ryan, Mary Skemp Brown, Eric L. Krakauer, M.R. Rajagopal, Martha A. Maurer, James F. Cleary, Opioid Availability and Palliative Care in Nepal: Influence of an International Pain Policy Fellowship, Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Volume 49, Issue 1, January 2015, Pages 110-116, ISSN 0885-3924, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2014.02.011.
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0885392414002176)
Abstract:
Author: 
Bishnu Dutta Paudel, Karen M. Ryan, Mary Skemp Brown, Eric L. Krakauer, M.R. Rajagopal, Martha A. Maurer, James F. Cleary, Opioid Availability and Palliative Care in Nepal: Influence of an International Pain Policy Fellowship, Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Volume 49, Issue 1, January 2015, Pages 110-116, ISSN 0885-3924, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2014.02.011.
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0885392414002176)

Abstract

The Federal Drug Enforcement Administration "prescription series" proposal: Continuing concerns

Citation:

Gilson AM, Joranson DE. The Federal Drug Enforcement Administration "prescription series" proposal: Continuing concerns. J Pain Palliat Care Pharmacother 2007;21:21-24.

Abstract:
Author: 

Gilson AM, Joranson DE. The Federal Drug Enforcement Administration "prescription series" proposal: Continuing concerns. J Pain Palliat Care Pharmacother 2007;21:21-24.

Two leading health and pain policy analysts discuss the implications of the federal Drug Enforcement Administration proposed position on the legality of practitioners writing series of controlled substance prescriptions for the purpose of providing ongoing pain management without the necessity for unneeded patient visits to their prescribers. This issue led to a series of regulatory proposals that engendered great concern in the pain management community. The proposed positive outcome from the DEA is described.

Improving state pain policies: Recent progress and continuing opportunities

Citation:

Gilson AM, Joranson DE, Maurer MA. Improving state pain policies: Recent progress and continuing opportunities. CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians 2007;57:341-353.

Abstract:
Author: 

Gilson AM, Joranson DE, Maurer MA. Improving state pain policies: Recent progress and continuing opportunities. CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians 2007;57:341-353.

No abstract available for this article.

 (PDF)

Do International Model Drug Control Laws Provide for Drug Availability?

Citation:

Pain & Policy Studies Group. Do International Model Drug Control Laws Provide for Drug Availability? J Pain Palliat Care Pharmacother 2009;23:145-152.

Abstract:
Author: 

Pain & Policy Studies Group. Do International Model Drug Control Laws Provide for Drug Availability? J Pain Palliat Care Pharmacother 2009;23:145-152.

A preliminary review of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) model drug control laws was conducted by the Pain & Policy Studies Group (PPSG) to determine whether the models provided governments with language they can use to carry out the obligation to ensure adequate availability of opioid analgesics for the relief of pain and suffering, specified in the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, 1961 as amended, and as recommended by the International Narcotics Control Board in 1995. The results showed that current model laws lack the drug availability provisions.

Ensuring patient access to essential medicines while minimizing harmful use: A revised WHO tool to improve national drug control policy

Citation:

Gilson AM, Maurer MA, Ryan KM, Skemp-Brown M, Husain A, Cleary JF. Ensuring patient access to essential medicines while minimizing harmful use: A revised WHO tool to improve national drug control policy. J Pain Palliat Care Pharmacother 2011;25:246-251.

Abstract:
Author: 

Gilson AM, Maurer MA, Ryan KM, Skemp-Brown M, Husain A, Cleary JF. Ensuring patient access to essential medicines while minimizing harmful use: A revised WHO tool to improve national drug control policy. J Pain Palliat Care Pharmacother 2011;25:246-251.

In 2011, the World Health Organization (WHO) published a series of 21 guidelines to assist governments in improving their national drug control laws, regulations, and administrative procedures to promote the availability of controlled medicines for pain relief and for a variety of acute and chronic diseases and conditions. These guidelines ultimately are designed to encourage the development of policies designed to fulfill a country's dual obligation concerning these medicines: to prevent their abuse, diversion and trafficking while ensuring access for medical and scientific purposes.

Using a morphine equivalence metric to quantify opioid consumption: Examining the capacity to provide effective treatment of debilitating pain at the global, regional and country levels

Citation:

 

Gilson AM, Maurer MA, Ryan KM, Rathouz PJ, Cleary JF. Using a Morphine Equivalence Metric to Quantify Opioid Consumption: Examining the Capacity to Provide Effective Treatment of Debilitating Pain at the Global, Regional, and Country Levels. J Pain Symptom Manage 2013; 45(4):681-700.
 
Abstract:
Author: 

 

Gilson AM, Maurer MA, Ryan KM, Rathouz PJ, Cleary JF. Using a Morphine Equivalence Metric to Quantify Opioid Consumption: Examining the Capacity to Provide Effective Treatment of Debilitating Pain at the Global, Regional, and Country Levels. J Pain Symptom Manage 2013; 45(4):681-700.
 

Context

Italy reforms national policy for cancer pain relief and opioids

Citation:

Blengini C, Joranson DE, Ryan KM. Italy reforms national policy for cancer pain relief and opioids. Eur J Cancer Care 2003;12:28-34.

Abstract:
Author: 

Blengini C, Joranson DE, Ryan KM. Italy reforms national policy for cancer pain relief and opioids. Eur J Cancer Care 2003;12:28-34.

Treatment of pain caused by cancer in Italy has been reported to be inadequate for more than a decade. The problem has been documented in the literature by International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) reports that show Italy's low consumption of morphine, and by INCB statements reflecting concern that pain medications are not adequately available to suffering cancer patients. The reasons for undertreatment include lack of physician education, low public awareness about pain management and overly restrictive regulations that inhibit the prescribing of opioid analgesics.

Country: 

Opioid Policy, Availability and Access in Developing and Nonindustrialized Countries

Citation:

Joranson DE, Ryan KM, Maurer MA. Opioid policy, availability and access in developing and nonindustrialized countries. In: Fishman SM, Ballantyne JC, Rathmell JP, eds. Bonica's Management of Pain. 4th ed. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2010;194-208.

Abstract:
Author: 

Joranson DE, Ryan KM, Maurer MA. Opioid policy, availability and access in developing and nonindustrialized countries. In: Fishman SM, Ballantyne JC, Rathmell JP, eds. Bonica's Management of Pain. 4th ed. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2010;194-208.

More than two decades ago, an expert committee of the World Health Organization (WHO) concluded that most pain due to cancer could be relieved if health professionals would use a relatively simple analgesic method and if patients could have access to opioids such as oral morphine.1 The WHO analgesic method also has been endorsed for relief of pain due to HIV/AIDS.2

Integrating palliative care in public health: The Colombian experience following an International Pain Policy Fellowship

Citation:

Leon MX, Florez S, De Lima L, Ryan K. Integrating palliative care in public health:  The Colombian experience following an International Pain Policy Fellowship. Palliat Med 2011; published on-line 12 January 2011.

Abstract:
Author: 

Leon MX, Florez S, De Lima L, Ryan K. Integrating palliative care in public health:  The Colombian experience following an International Pain Policy Fellowship. Palliat Med 2011; published on-line 12 January 2011.

Access to palliative care is insufficient in many countries around the world. In an effort to improve access to palliative care services and treatments, a public health approach as suggested by the World Health Organization was implemented in Colombia to improve opioid availability, increase awareness and competences about palliative care for healthcare workers, and to include palliative care as a component of care in legislation.

Country: 

Improving the availability and accessibility of opioids for the treatment of pain: The International Pain Policy Fellowship

Citation:

Bosnjak S, Maurer MA, Ryan KM, Leon MX, Madiye G. Improving the availability and accesibility of opioids for the treatment of pain: The International Pain Policy Fellowship. Journal of Supportive Care in Cancer 2011;19:1239-1247.

Abstract:
Author: 

Bosnjak S, Maurer MA, Ryan KM, Leon MX, Madiye G. Improving the availability and accesibility of opioids for the treatment of pain: The International Pain Policy Fellowship. Journal of Supportive Care in Cancer 2011;19:1239-1247.

Opioid analgesics are simultaneously indispensable medicines for the treatment of moderate to severe pain and harmful when abused. The challenge for governments is to balance the obligation to prevent diversion, trafficking and abuse of opioids with the equally important obligation to ensure their availability and accessibility for the relief of pain and suffering. Over the last 30 years, significant progress has been made toward improving access to opioids as measured by increasing global medical opioid consumption.

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