pain management

The Federal Drug Enforcement Administration "prescription series" proposal: Continuing concerns

Citation:

Gilson AM, Joranson DE. The Federal Drug Enforcement Administration "prescription series" proposal: Continuing concerns. J Pain Palliat Care Pharmacother 2007;21:21-24.

Abstract:
Author: 

Gilson AM, Joranson DE. The Federal Drug Enforcement Administration "prescription series" proposal: Continuing concerns. J Pain Palliat Care Pharmacother 2007;21:21-24.

Two leading health and pain policy analysts discuss the implications of the federal Drug Enforcement Administration proposed position on the legality of practitioners writing series of controlled substance prescriptions for the purpose of providing ongoing pain management without the necessity for unneeded patient visits to their prescribers. This issue led to a series of regulatory proposals that engendered great concern in the pain management community. The proposed positive outcome from the DEA is described.

Ensuring opioid availability: Methods and resources

Citation:

Joranson DE, Ryan KM. Ensuring opioid availability: Methods and resources. J Pain Symptom Manage 2007;33:527-532.

Abstract:
Author: 

Joranson DE, Ryan KM. Ensuring opioid availability: Methods and resources. J Pain Symptom Manage 2007;33:527-532.

The pain and palliative care fields are encouraged to learn about government drug control policy and to engage with their governments to examine these policies and their implementation in order to address impediments to patient access to pain management. Although pain management is a necessary part of palliative care, it is often impossible because strict national and state regulations block access to opioid analgesics.

Opioid Policy, Availability and Access in Developing and Nonindustrialized Countries

Citation:

Joranson DE, Ryan KM, Maurer MA. Opioid policy, availability and access in developing and nonindustrialized countries. In: Fishman SM, Ballantyne JC, Rathmell JP, eds. Bonica's Management of Pain. 4th ed. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2010;194-208.

Abstract:
Author: 

Joranson DE, Ryan KM, Maurer MA. Opioid policy, availability and access in developing and nonindustrialized countries. In: Fishman SM, Ballantyne JC, Rathmell JP, eds. Bonica's Management of Pain. 4th ed. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2010;194-208.

More than two decades ago, an expert committee of the World Health Organization (WHO) concluded that most pain due to cancer could be relieved if health professionals would use a relatively simple analgesic method and if patients could have access to opioids such as oral morphine.1 The WHO analgesic method also has been endorsed for relief of pain due to HIV/AIDS.2

Syndicate content